The Closing of the American Mind

Alan Bloom’s classic (title above) was published in 1984. It could easily have been published this morning with every bit as much relevance as it carried almost 40 years ago. Bloom’s thesis is simple: Think deeply. Think critically. And don’t allow others to do your thinking for you. Refuse to be intellectually bullied. Saul Bellow’s … Continue reading The Closing of the American Mind

The Hubris of Some Scientists

The hubris of some Scientists. Notice I did not say “the hubris of science”, but "scientists.”  Also, note that I said, "some scientists."  Because there are a host of scholars within the scientific disciplines who have professed their faith in Christ. (For one solid resource for finding scientists who have placed their faith in Christ, … Continue reading The Hubris of Some Scientists

The Deconstruction of the Christian Faith

The Deconstruction of the Christian Faith Nick Watts, August 2022   Preface The topic about which I'm writing is actually nothing new, certainly not unique to modern times.  Jesus, himself, told his disciples two millennia ago, "I have told you these things so that you won’t abandon your faith." I try to always document and … Continue reading The Deconstruction of the Christian Faith

Small Group Teacher Workshop Notes – April 2021

The Art of Welcoming & The 7 Laws of the Learner, Law No. 1 **for Part 2 of 2 click here. THE ART OF WELCOMING Introduction: Environment carries much more power than we give it credit for. Think back to the theme song to the beloved sitcom, Cheers: ‘Sometimes you wanna go where everybody knows … Continue reading Small Group Teacher Workshop Notes – April 2021

How do you know you’re not wrong?

Ever have those types of conversations at coffee shops or via social media? When dialoguing about worldviews (especially in today’s relativistic, “hey, whatever works for you” culture), some deep and reasonable thinking is required. Philosophy is hard.  It takes serious mental discipline. (My 'Philosophy of Religion' class, studying the works of Descartes, Hume, Nietzsche, and … Continue reading How do you know you’re not wrong?

Knowing Why You Believe What You Believe

When I began honestly investigating reasons for the Christian faith it changed everything. My faith, over time, became my own. No longer was my answer for being a Christian, "The preacher said it's true," or "Grandma said it's true." It's ok - very ok - to doubt your faith. John the Baptist, according to Jesus' … Continue reading Knowing Why You Believe What You Believe