Where is Christ in the Old Testament? (Everywhere)

“When (Apollos) arrived [in Corinth], he greatly helped those who through grace had believed, for he powerfully refuted the Jews in public, showing by the [Old Testament] Scriptures that the Christ was Jesus.”  (Acts 18:27-28)

Where does Jesus show up in our Bible?  The Gospels?  Nope.  How about Genesis 1…    Paul wrote in Colossians 1:16, For by [Christ] all things were created, in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or dominions or rulers or authorities—all things were created through him and for him.”

The disciple, John, began his gospel this way:  “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God…All things were made through Him, and without Him was not anything made…”  (1:1-3)  Later, in verse 14, to make certain his readers understood he was writing about Christ, John wrote, “And the Word became flesh and dwelt among us.”

In his classic, “Christ in the Old Testament,” Charles Spurgeon wrote, “To the disciples on the moonlit road, the Master, beginning at Moses and all the prophets, expounded the things concerning Himself.  He is everywhere in Scripture; patriarchs and kings are types of Him who is the Ancient of Days and the Prince of Peace; the Law was but a shadow of good things to come, and the testimony of Jesus is the spirit of prophecy.  The Old Testament was Christ’s Bible, and it is a Bible full of Christ.”

The early church fathers championed the axiom, “Christ is, in the Old Testament, concealed; and in the New Testament, revealed.”

Christ is Genesis through Revelation – the Living Word made flesh; the Alpha and the Omega; the Beginning and the End.

Soli Deo Gloria, Nick

The 23rd Psalm

“It has charmed more griefs to rest than all the philosophy of the world. It has remanded to their dungeon more felon thoughts, more black doubts, more thieving sorrows, than there are sands on the sea-shore. It has comforted the noble host of the poor. It has sung courage to the army of the disappointed. It has poured balm and consolation into the heart of the sick, of captives in dungeons, of widows in their griefs, of orphans in their loneliness. Dying soldiers have died easier as it was read to them; it has visited the prisoner, broken his chains and, like Peter’s angel, led him forth in imagination, and sung him back to his home again.” Charles Spurgeon; “The Treasury of David: Classic Reflections on the Wisdom of the Psalms”

***No other psalm has so saved me from going insane this past 21 months than this psalm. Reflect on it today, my friends. I love you all. Nick

“The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not want. He makes me lie down in green pastures. He leads me beside still waters. He restores my soul. He leads me in paths of righteousness for his name’s sake.

Even though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil, for you are with me; your rod and your staff, they comfort me.

You prepare a table before me in the presence of my enemies; you anoint my head with oil; my cup overflows. Surely goodness and mercy shall follow me all the days of my life, and I shall dwell in the house of the Lord forever.”

Preaching With the Listener in Mind

One very wise author once wrote, “Too often, preachers focus solely on whether or not there had been great Bible teaching on Sunday morning, when they should also be asking themselves whether or not there was any great Bible LEARNING.” ouch. Recently, I came across the following quote by the 19th century, British preacher, Charles Spurgeon.

“Some preachers, put the food so high that neither lambs nor sheep can reach it. They seem to have read the text, ‘feed my giraffes.”- Charles Spurgeon

Psalm 23 – “Bible Learning Series” Notes

Friends,

Below are the “series notes” to my series on Psalm 23. All that’s missing are additional comments I included while teaching. However, the “nuts & bolts” are here for your study.

Paul wrote, “Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly,…” (Colossians 3:16)

May the verse-by-verse study of this simple, yet profound, passage of Scripture (1) provide the reader with a richer understanding of the Good Shepherd, Jesus Christ, and (2) give the reader a “hunger & thirst for righteousness” (Matthew 5:6) to “mine the treasure” of more of God’s Word.

NOTE: Because of time constraints I was forced to combine the teaching series into three sessions, teaching 2 verses at a time. However, in hindsight, considering the wealth of truth within each single verse, a six-week series (one verse per session) would’ve been more conducive to allowing the scripture to “soak in.” (I don’t know about you – but my limited mind can only take in so much at a time.)) That said, the notes divided into verse-by-verse sessions. Should you desire to read, or print, any of the notes simply click on the link. You’ll be taken directly to the PDF file. nw

Psalm 23 – Intro & Verse 1
Psalm 23 – Verse 2
Psalm 23 – Verse 3
Psalm 23 – Verse 4
Psalm 23 – Verse 5
Psalm 23 – Verse 6

“The Lord Is My Shepherd” – An In-Depth Study of Psalm 23 (Session 1, Vs 1)

psalm 23 2

My friends, rather than upload a recording of my talk, I thought I’d simply write out my notes in an easy-to-read format for you. (This way, you also don’t have to hear me, over and over again, become emotional as I speak 🙂 …..Christ has used this passage so powerfully in my life since the passing of my beloved son.)

May you get to know the Shepherd more intimately in your study. And, after studying and meditating upon this great psalm, may we all gain a stronger, broader understanding of what it really means when we say, “The Lord is my Shepherd.” Simply click on the link for the PDF file.

Psalm 23 – Session 1 – Intro & Verse 1

Soli Deo Gloria, Nick